Confused By Documentary Stamp Tax and Intangibles Tax? Everyone Else Is, Too!

DocstampLast week I attended a Continuing Legal Education (CLE) seminar on Florida’s documentary stamp tax and non-recurring intangibles tax and I left feeling as though I knew less about about them than when I walked in. Now, of course, that’s not entirely true – a lot of good information was conveyed and I did learn things I didn’t know before. However, it did leave me keenly aware that Florida’s documentary stamp tax and intangibles tax are confusing even to the experts who study them closely.

I don’t really know why they’re so confused. The general rules are pretty simple: (1) any instrument that conveys any interest in real property for consideration is subject to Florida’s documentary stamp tax; and (2) any obligation to pay money that is secured by Florida real property is subject to Florida’s non-recurring intangibles tax.

With regard to documentary stamp tax, deeds, easements and options are just a few of the instruments that convey real property interests that are subject to the doc stamp tax so the list of instruments subject to tax is probably broader than most people realize. But, other than figuring out if a conveyance of a real property interest is occurring it’s all pretty simple.

Well, except that some conveyances are made for no consideration, such as gifts of property, transfers between spouses for estate planning purposes, transfers due to divorce, and so on. And sometimes even if you don’t think there’s any consideration the State has defined certain situations where consideration is “deemed” to have been given even if no money changes hands, so the definition of “consideration” can be confusing. But, really, other than figuring out if a conveyance of a real property interest is occurring and whether consideration is being given or is deemed to have been given, it’s all pretty simple.

Well, except that there’s also a long list of specific exemptions – situations where you would think tax would be due but the State says it’s not. And some of the exemptions aren’t very clear. But, really, other than figuring out if a conveyance of a real property interest is occurring and whether consideration is being given or is deemed to have been given and whether any random exemptions apply, it’s all pretty simple.

Oh, I forgot. Documentary stamp tax is also due on obligations to pay money (such as a promissory note) executed or delivered in the State of Florida. Executed OR delivered. In state. So a borrower and lender can take one step over the state line, sign a note, and no tax is due? Or take a boat out into international waters? True! As long as it is signed AND delivered outside of the State of Florida. So let’s just always do that, right, because we’ll save money, right? Not so fast. The tax is capped at $2,450 if it’s not secured by real estate so travelling out of state is generally not worth the trouble and expense because the cap makes it cheaper to just pay the tax in most cases. Why $2,450? The State is smart enough to have calculated the average cost that a person is willing to tolerate paying before going to all the effort to travel out of state with their banker just to execute and deliver a note. Pretty clever, huh?

[Update Feb. 13, 2014 – Question posed to me: What about an out of state lender with an out of state borrower who wants to sign a note while he’s here on vacation? With no other connection to the State of Florida except that he’s vacationing here. Tax is due because the note was executed in-state. Crazy!]

 Ok, I lied. I understand exactly why everyone is so confused. It’s because, sometimes, Florida’s documentary stamp tax makes no sense whatsoever!

At least Florida’s intangibles tax is pretty easy to understand. If you have an obligation to pay money secured by Florida real property the intangibles tax is due. Period. End of story. I think.

And so it goes. Just call your trusted commercial real estate attorney (hey, maybe that’s me!) if you have questions about Florida’s documentary stamp tax or non-recurring intangibles tax. It’s confusing enough that occasionally he or she (or I) may not have the answer immediately and might have to do a little research to get you the right answer, we might even have to call the Department of Revenue to figure it out, but it will be worth it (a) to save tax where tax can be saved, and (b) to avoid a Florida Department of Revenue inquiry if tax should be paid, but isn’t.

As always, thanks for reading. Please send your questions and comments and SHARE this article with others!

BH

Comments

  1. John P. Sidd says:

    I recently had a client with a Florida documentary tax issue and Brad was very helpfuly in resolving the issue for me.

Speak Your Mind

*